Biggest scandals in gambling recent history

As you could imagine when talking about a domain as vast and as popular as gambling, you could very much expect bad things to also happen quite often. When all is said and done when we’re talking about a playing session, cards, slots or other types of betting, people win money, people lose money, but some of them choose to conduct themselves in manners that directly contradict with casinos policies and gambling rules.

Phil Ivey’s cheating scandal

One of the most recognizable poker players in the world, Phil Ivey Is being taken for everything he s won at the Borgata casino in Atlantic City. The casino is pursuing the New Jersey’s-born poker legend assets in an attempt to recoup the huge loss that they encountered when Ivey admittedly used a cheating tactic to gain an edge in a baccarat game. No less than $10.16 million was lost by the Borgata casino when Ivey and an accomplice won the amount in just 4 days. Later investigation shows that Ivey knowingly cheated and exploited the casinos’ and dealers’ weaknesses.

Hayley Hintze from FlushDraw.com’s has investigated and discovered that, on the 29th of January, the hotel-casino received direct legal approval from a New Jersey judge to broaden their stance and their investigation into uncovering the depths of Ivey’s cheating and to try to recoup the losses they encountered.

To make it even more difficult, Ivey did not have a single account on his name in the state he’s been born and raised, and it seems all of his money is abroad, where the casino does not have approval or jurisdiction to act.

What’s Edge Sorting in Baccarat?

Back in the winter, 3 years ago, December 2016, a federal court in New Jersey decided and officially ruled that Ivey and “Kelly” Cheung Yin Sun have the obligation to repay the $9.6 million they won during a four-day stint at the casino’s baccarat tables in 2012 in full. Even More, an extra $504,000 that was won by Ivey at the craps table is also disputed, but the legend’s lawyers try to dispute that the win has no common points with the baccarat table ‘’incident’’.

The 2 partners in crime ( pun intended) were using an edge-sorting tactic, a very old but highly effective tactic in which the player can determine the value of the playing cards simply by noticing specific patterns or design modifications. That creates an unfair advantage for the player and it quite simply changes the rules and odds for the game.

The Borgata claimed they were cheating and sued them for fraud. For their part, Ivey and Sun did not deny edge-sorting but argued they were using skill to muscle the odds in their favor, legally. Despite having a small advantage in the game, they said, they were still gambling and could still have lost.

Although the pair did not touch or tamper with the playing cards, they did, however, ask the dealers to tilt the cards or move them in a specific way in which they could use the angle to their advantage.

Appeal Problematic for Ivey

Ye. The judge decided that the two players were in breach of their contract and decided against their appeal, claiming it had no basis in reality.

“By using cards they caused to be maneuvered in order to identify their value only to them, Ivey and Sun adjusted the odds of baccarat in their favor,” said US District Judge Noel Hillman in his ruling. “This is in complete contravention of the fundamental purpose of legalized gambling.”

Ivey and Sun have appealed the judgment, but for the court to consider hearing the case, they would first need to post a supersedeas bond, equal to the disputed amount — something they appear to be unwilling to do at this stage.

Ivey was scheduled to appear at a deposition in New Jersey on January 30 to discuss his assets. It is not clear whether he attended, as the relevant court filings have not yet been updated.

The Fake VIP room

No less than 16 individuals were arrested late last year after a big hoax operation was uncovered. The individuals were posing as casino operators and staff, making quite believable VIP rooms from luxury sweets. The Macau Post reported that the operation was actually part of a much larger crime syndicate operation that also had, at that time at least, several ties with casinos and other several gambling operations.

Drugs and Sedatives at the scene

When it was raided, the operation had around $12.5 million in betting chips at the location, seized by the local authorities, along with many gambling-related promotional materials and utilities. There were also found a number od dru8gs and quite a large quantity of them, along with hard liquor and other substances that are completely forbidden in any regular casino.

The Two-year operation unveiled

On the more ‘’shocking’’ note, the VIP hoax was going on for no less than 2 years, a time span in which the authorities had absolutely nop clue about what was happening. The authorities were also impressed with the level of preparation that the conmen showed, with a long list of arrangements s being made to the smallest of details.

But painting a seedier picture of the syndicate and its operations, there are allegations that drinks were spiked with drugs, and fake shuffling occurred to ensure the unsuspecting players just didn’t stand a chance in the fake casino lounge.

But those who get greedy eventually get caught by the law, and it was only a matter of time until the syndicate got caught carrying out their scam. However, although they may have scammed many unsuspecting victims out of their hard-earned cash and made them forever wary of any special treatment, the perpetrators (one from Macau, and fifteen from mainland China) now face a sentence anywhere between 18 months to three years. And there won’t be any VIP rooms where they’re going, either.